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Polar Plunge!

Here’s a brief but spiritually invigorating (brrr, especially today!) video sent from subscriber and great humanist Mordechai Levin, who lives along the Nippersink Creek in Richmond, McHenry, Illinois. He suggests that the creek be renamed, the “NipperMink”…

 

If you know of the wonderful work of the poet, Mary Oliver, you will enjoy this poem of her’s (I don’t have permission to publish it, but I hope she will forgive me when each of you buys her latest book, A Thousand Mornings, or Evidence, the earlier book containing this poem, entitled, It Was Early:

It was early, which has always been my hour to begin looking at the world and of course, even in the darkness, to begin listening into it, especially under the pines where the owl lives and sometimes calls out as I walk by, as he did on this morning.   So many gifts! What do they mean?   In the marshes where the pink light was just arriving the mink with his bristle tail was stalking the soft-eared mice, and in the pines the cones were heavy, each one ordained to open.   Sometimes I need only to stand wherever I am to be blessed.   Little mink, let me watch you. Little mice, run and run. Dear pine cone, let me hold you as you open.”

HAPPIEST NEW YEAR, FULL OF BLESSINGS, WHEREVER YOU FIND YOURSELF STANDING.##

Mink-by-Audubon
Potorius vison [Mink] by John James Audubon, printed 1844.

STOP the presses and read this!

Many of you know that I volunteer with a GREAT charity called Mothers Trust Foundation (MTF). It is so great that it won the “2013 Human Services Philanthropy Award” by Make It Better magazine, and the prize was a free professional videotape for marketing our organization. This week the tapings were done, which included testimonials by social workers from Lake County (IL) and some of the oh-so-desperately-poor kids they help, each discussing how MTF came to the rescue.

Today MTF’s Executive Director, Cheri Richardson, received two emails, which she forwarded to volunteers and I want to share with you. The first comes from the movie director, Adam, describing his experience with “Henry”. But make sure you keep reading…read down and take in the email from Brenda, the social worker from an elementary school that suggested that Henry’s story might be just right for the movie. And then believe in all things right and good. There is a Santa…or is there an angel among us?

From Adam the Director:

“Cheri: Wow – what a story.  And two incredible interviews!  That kid was something else – such a little character!  He has been through SO much and yet he was so resilient and funny.  We’ve been quoting him nonstop.  He was just a piece of work.  The first thing he did was challenge himself to conduct the first ever blooper-free interview.  Next, he told us about his design for a perpetual motion machine.  Free energy!  He described it in great detail, then asked me, “do you know how many schools you could power with a machine like that?”

I responded, “all of them?” His answer: “35.”

We were dying…so cute and funny!

And Brenda was amazing.  She cried.  And pretty much had us on the verge of tears.  That’s a social worker who cares!

I’ll tell you what – MTF has some fans out there.  The challenge will be cutting this thing down to a manageable length – there are so many gems of wisdom and insight “in the can” – we have an embarrassment of riches”.

And here’s the show-stopper from Brenda the Social Worker:

“Hi Cheri!

It was a blast watching Henry and hearing him tell his “Life Story”!  I didn’t know if I should have laughed or cried….so I did a little of both!  The crew was really fantastic, just like you said they’d be.  I hope we were able to represent Mothers Trust Foundation in a way it should be represented!  Thanks for giving us the privilege!

It was quite a day for Henry….right after his interview, he had to go to the police station to meet DCFS.  They were planning to take him into custody and put him in some type of temporary foster care.  Well, long story short, they couldn’t find family or foster care setting that would take him immediately—so I have him!  Yes, he is at my house right now.  It looks as though he will be here for the holidays!  The family was evicted from their house because of squalor-like conditions (sewage backup) in the home.  It’s condemned and no one can get in.  Family is split up right now.

It’s very interesting…my hubby and I are usually alone and not used to entertaining a 12 year old.

Hope you have a very special Christmas season.  Take care, Brenda

 P.S.  If you know of anyone who is a foster parent in the Waukegan/Zion area, please let me know”!

Merry Merry Christmas, Weedpatch readers. May your hearts be full of peace and love for all the Henry’s and Brenda’s in the world. xxx’s Rommy ##

Silence All Around

I was thinking about what I could write about while driving home from the dentist today. I looked into a forest preserve I was passing and thought, “Nothing. I can’t think of anything to write about gardening. It is just so damn gray today”. But inspiration sometimes comes out of being quiet and letting the silence in, you know? So here I was, sitting at my desk, quietly, a little somber, when I looked at a book winking from the shelf, and instinctively knew that Donald Culross Peattie would have something to offer.

For those of you who may not know Mr. Peattie, he was a naturalist and author who was born in Chicago in 1898, went to the University of Chicago, worked for government and newspapers, but spent much of his life in France. He wrote about the inter-connectedness among all living things, about nature’s “head scratchers”, and about wonder, the big picture, the tiny aspect (maybe the little gasp we make when we glimpse a first bloodroot in spring), oddities, and even ugly dis-pleasures. Mr. Peattie also wrote about utopians, botanists, wilderness plantsmen, and the romanticists. Take this sprig of his thoughts, for example: “[Compared to Romanticism]…our aims today are cautious, niggardly, unattached to fundamentals. One science is out of touch with another, and they are all shockingly out of touch with philosophy, art and religion. There IS one-ness about Nature, but scientists are lazy about looking for it. Take the sexuality of plants, for example…”. Ah, Mr. Peattie, you must have been a Scot. Poetic yet scientifically demanding.

Maybe I like Mr. Peattie so much because fabulous black and white woodcuts illustrate his nature books.

Anyway, Mr. Peattie must also have been staring out the window onto a gray December day, for this is what he wrote about today in his book, An Almanac for Moderns [1935]:

“Now everywhere in the woods, silence. There is not a single hum from the fields, of insects tuning up their tiny orchestras. I cannot think what can have become of even the crows; the squirrels today have fled the boughs; there is no scampering of chipmunks; there are no brooks that speak, only a slow dwindling of rivulets, and no pods that click, no sudden whirring of pheasant from under foot. The sky is heavy with unshed snow, and even when it falls, it will make no sound, spinning down in the first great, starry flakes, in silence. Everywhere, only silence…silence”.#

 middllefork savanna P10201681