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September. Already?

Man, time flies. And so many projects (ie dividing Iris, dividing everything, cleaning garage) are left undone, again this year. But I just had to go for a walk with Daughter #2 who snapped this great photo…

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It was also important to create a feast (salad Nicoise) using our own “farm farsh” eggs. Alas, the black olives and string beans for the salad were not from our garden, but the broccoli and Brussels sprouts and herbs and tomatoes were. It’s been a lousy year for all tomatoes but those zinnias–magnifique–the best year ever!  

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And I even managed to make peach preserves yesterday.

canning peach preserves

Happy Labor Day! Here comes Fall..#    

Landscape’s Loss

It is a sad day in Chicago landscape history, for internationally-known landscape architect Peter Schaudt, 56, died on July 19. Peter was co-partner in the firm [Doug] Hoerr Schaudt. Here is his obituary, written by Chicago Tribune architecture critic, Blair Kamin.

Blair also wrote a story back in 2011 when Doug’s prairie at Trump Tower in Chicago was ripped out after just one year and replaced with a more conventional garden. It’s wasteful and always shocking to me just how often one designer’s work gets tossed. A sad phenomenon.

Peter was a very great talent. Chicago should be very proud to have had him as our’s.#
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Catching Up: First Monarch in the July Garden

Monarch season is starting very slowly. The first Monarch I noticed, perched on a stockade fence, in our Lake Forest garden visited last week. Alas, I had no camera in hand. Yesterday morning, however, this mistah buttafly flitted onto the Allium ‘Summer Beauty’ (a must-have plant, durable as hell), completely ignoring the nearby, wait for it…Butterfly Weed [Asclepias tuberosa].  I haven’t seen any Monarchs at all at our farm in Richmond, about an hour northwest of Lake Forest. Hopefully it’s still early, but the Milkweed is going to seed already so…

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Right nearby, a Red Admiral was enjoying the Allium as well. These are common “lady butterflies” which do take nectar but are more partial to eating overripe fruit, sap, and yes, old meat and poo-poo. (Butterflies may look beautiful, but the back story can be really terrible.) And, like some males of our species, it is said that the “males are territorial, especially in the late afternoon and evening. They select a perch where the sun shines and dart out at passing objects as they search for females.” Bring it on, fellas!#

Butterfly-Red-Admiral

Look but Don’t Touch

I know, I know, dear readers, that I have been absent from writing since April. And even today I am only given you un petit soupcon of a post. Here’s our lovely vegetable garden showing off broccoli and lettuce, but alas, there’s been too much humidity and rain to actually garden in it. But tonight, tonight, we will be consuming some of that lettuce–planted back in April when I should have been writing to you. All my best. It’s a rain forest out there… Rommy  

Richmond-Veggie-Garden

UP in the Garden, UP in the Prairie, UP in the Lake

It’s the end of March and the weather has been down (a horrible cold blustery day last Sunday, March 29) and UP (today is 60 and sunny). I heard a radio report  that ships won’t be able to get to Burns Harbor, IN for another two weeks because the Lakes are still too frozen. But out in the the gardens, it’s fun to notice hints of color popping UP thru the soil. And yesterday was, “Drop Everything Day! It’s perfect for the prairie!” so off we went to the farm to be pyromaniacs. Fire it UP! And then on the way home, two geese in Redwing Slough in Antioch gave me a great big chuckle…Bottoms UP!

color in the garden 
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witch hazel

snowdrops

prairie burn

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prairie burn 3

pond
HAPPY EASTER TO ALL WHO LOVE PLANTS AND ANIMALS.##