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This Weekend: The One Earth Film Festival

one earth film festival

If this winter weather is getting to you, think about a refreshing green weekend and come to the One Earth Film Festival! Some big movers and shakers of the environmental “care for planet, love the earth” will be here, and you don’t want to miss it.

One Earth has events scheduled all over Chicagoland, including such gems as:

  • “Angel Azul” at the Chicago Cultural Center.  Awarded best documentary at the Breckenridge Film Festival. Explore the artistic journey of Jason deCaires Taylor, an innovative artist who creates artificial coral reefs.
  • “Virunga” at Northwestern University, Evanston. 2015 Academy Award Nominee for Best Documentary Feature. The incredible true story of a group of brave individuals risking their lives to build a better future in the Congo.
  • “Project Wild Thing” at Prairie Crossing School in Grayslake. Finalist in the Social Impact Media Awards 2014. Parent David Bond decides its time to get back to nature, and appoints himself “Marketing Director for Nature.” Is Nature past its sell-by date?
  • Much more:  See the Schedule of Events

Fourth Annual One Earth Film Festival
40 inspirational films
30 unique venues
March 6 – 8, 2015

Perennial Professionals!

If you’ve ever shopped at Chalet Nursery in Wilmette, or watched Channel 7 TV in the morning, or listened to Mike Nowak’s Garden Show (lamentedly it is no more), or well, just been around the plant world, you have seen the ever-enthusiastic Jennifer “Who Knows More Than God About Plants” Brennan.

Jennifer’s energy and exuberance knows no bounds. The woman doesn’t ever snooze. In addition to all else, she is now serving as the central region director of the Perennial Plant Association (PPA), which is the group which designates the “perennial plant of the year” for retailers to type. In 2014 it was Panicum virgatum ‘Northwind” which was grown from wild-collected seed from South Elgin, Illinois. This blue-green, erect grass was found by Chicago’s “very own” Roy Diblik, co-owner of Northwind Perennial Farm in Springfield, Wisconsin and author of The Know Maintenance Perennial Garden.

The PPA also holds seriously great conferences, most often attended by pro’s but they are nice people so anyone can go. So great that I’m still laughing about one that I attended in 1998 where a very famous landscape architect–old as the hills!–tried to kiss me out behind the hydrangeas. When I got back on the bus, I told my friend Pam about the incident. She laughed so hard, then said, “Ha! I was 1996!”

But I digress. Jennifer has organized a conference which every one of you MUST attend if you like perennials. And who doesn’t? Plus you get to go to The Morton Arboretum, which it’s time for you to revisit. It’s fantastic! Here’s the announcement of this wonderful conference. You will learn so much! Here’s the direct link for registration: http://www.mortonarb.org/events

 

regional perennial plant symposium

regional perennial plant symposium-2

 

Good Conference on Native Gardening: Nov 15th

Hi, everyone. If you want to hear some excellent speakers, check out this conference, sponsored by The Wild Ones, to be held at the College of Lake County on Saturday, November 15. I loved the book on pollinator plants by Doug Tallamy who speaks at 9 am, and Ray Wiggers knows all about WHERE (ravines, gravel, sand, limestone, glacial ridges, lake bottoms, etc) plants grow best (and what fish and birds and insects are where) since he’s a geologist and naturalist. I read his book over and over because there is too much about Chicago’s natural history to absorb all at once. I wish I could attend this conference but I am committed to going to a meeting for my favorite children’s charity: Mothers Trust Foundation. Two good choices, but can’t do it all… Rommy

PS Probably the last of the beautiful autumn leaves will succumb to the wind today….here is a yellow witchhazel against a reddish Viburnum prunifolium. Great shrubs for everyone’s yard! Get rid of the dreaded buckthorn and plant these beauties instead!#

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Upcoming Garden Tour(s) in Lake Forest: Cultural Landscape Foundation

One of my favorite reference books is Pioneers of American Landscape Design, edited (2000) by two luminaries of landscape history, Charles Birnbaum and Robin Karson. They began compiling biographies of noted landscape architects back in 1992 (about the time I started publishing The Weedpatch Gazette and wondering why it was so difficult to find histories of people like Alfred Caldwell and Jens Jensen) and never looked back. Today Charles and Robin run the prestigious and impressive organizations, The Cultural Landscape Foundation and the Library of American Landscape History.

Next weekend, two garden tours will be held in Lake Forest to raise money for The Cultural Landscape Foundation. You are invited! I hope you will put aside the time. I have recently visited both homes and gardens, and they are an incredible treat to see, especially as they are tucked way down long private driveways where prying gardeners like me fear to tread. Here’s a snap I took of an entry to the Ellen Biddle Shipman garden, which was rehabilitated by landscape designer Craig Bergmann (whose own garden is a tour de force for posterity), on Lake Michigan:

Ellen Biddle Shipman Garden

Reserve a spot on the tours via this website:  http://tclf.org/event/garden-dialogues-chicago-lake-forest

Enjoy!##

Mississippi Flyway Used by Half of All North American Birds! Hear more next Monday…

Lake County Audubon Society welcomes all to attend a very important presentation on Monday, December 2, 7:30 pm, at the Libertyville Village Hall, 118 W. Cook Street, Libertyville, IL.

Chris Canfield, Vice President of the Mississippi Flyway and former VP Gulf of Mexico Conservation and Restoration, will discuss the National Audubon Society’s Mississippi Flyway, the role it plays in Audubon’s integrated conservation model, and the essential role that local Audubon chapters play in advancing National Audubon’s conservation priorities and success stories for birds.

Audubon is proud to have played a role in making a difference in the restoration plan that followed the Gulf oil spill as well as “working on the diverse team that helped make the RESTORE Act a reality [Queen Bee says: This act wisely gave all the BP money back to the Gulf instead of the US Treasury.] “ That funding will help revive vital wetlands that have been mismanaged for years as well as supporting a “river of birds,” since about half of North American species use the Mississippi Flyway at one time or another.

QUEEN BEE SAYS:  OPEN this link and LISTEN to this bird! http://birds.audubon.org/birds/greater-prairie-chicken. Wouldn’t you just die if a prairie chicken (a bird that counts on a healthy Mississippi and no bullets. Ahem.) was outside in your yard making his crazy noises?!

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Canfield did his undergraduate work at Birmingham-Southern College in Alabama and graduate work at the University of Oxford in England, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. Until September 2010, he was executive director of Audubon North Carolina, a National Audubon Society program he led for more than a decade.

All along its length, the river has been controlled and manipulated to the detriment of natural systems and the birds and other wildlife that depend on them. The upper river is governed by a series of dams and locks; the lower river is channeled by more than 1,600 miles of levees. Together, these structures confine the Mississippi to less than 10 percent of its original floodplain, and the sediment that historically fed the river’s vast delta in Louisiana no longer reaches marshes and coastal forests. As a result, 19 square miles of delta wetlands disappear each year.

But Audubon is making a difference for the birds, habitats, and communities of the Mississippi Flyway.

Support Audubon. These people (mostly volunteers) do great work! ## PS And turn off all the damn floodlights in your buildings and yard. Birds do not read books.

Buy a Hosta, Build a Future

Saturday, August 24, 9am-4pm Hosta Sale. 

Rich’s Foxwillow Pines Nursery in Woodstock, IL, will have several hundred varieties of hostas for sale to benefit Heifer International. All hostas are $5.00 and up. Heifer International (HI) is a non-profit, humanitarian organization dedicated to ending world hunger and poverty and caring for the earth. HI provides livestock, trees, training, and other resources to help struggling families build sustainable futures. The recipients of the animals must ‘pass on the gift’ of the first female offspring and training in environmentally sound agriculture to another family in need. In this manner, an endless cycle of transformation is set in motion as recipients become equal partners in ending poverty and hunger. Heifer International has provided food and income producing animals to more than 8.5 million impoverished families in 125 countries in the last 67 years. Rich Eyre worked with Heifer while in the Peace Corps 44 years ago in Bolivia and he can give testimony to its positive effects in those communities. Rich and Susan Eyre served 6 years on the Board of Trustees of the Heifer Foundation.

Rich and Susan just appeared on one of my favorite radio shows, WBEZ World View with Jerome McDonnell, because they were nominated as outstanding volunteers for a worldwide cause. Congratulations to them! Here’s their interview: http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-philplanthropy-108432.

Ed Slomski and Mike Krause coordinate volunteers to help divide and sell the hostas. Volunteers will be available to answer any questions about Heifer International on the day of the sale. On the day’s program:

  • 10am-noon Hosta Leaf Identification Tom Micheletti, former President of the American Hosta Society and Midwest Regional Hosta Society, and founder and first President of the Northern Illinois Hosta Society, will be available to identify hostas for people who bring the leaves of unknown hostas.
  • 1pm Hostas in the Landscape Tom Micheletti will do a short presentation about hostas.
  • 9am-4pmBolivian Arts & Crafts Fundraiser for Mano a Mano International Partnerswill raise money to build hospitals, schools, roads, and irrigation projects in rural Bolivia. There will be a variety of items for sale. Mano a Mano was originated by a fellow Peace Corps volunteer, Joan Velasquez, and her husband Segundo. In 2008 she won the Sargent Shriver Award for Distinguished Humanitarian Service awarded to a Returning Peace Corps Volunteer. Rich & Susan Eyre want to help Mano a Mano build 100 hospitals in Bolivia.

Refreshments will be served. Cash or check only! Rich’s Foxwillow Pines Nursery, 11618 McConnell Road Woodstock IL 60098. 815-338-7442. coniflora@richsfoxwillowpines.com.##

BELOW ARE THE HOSTAS IN ROMMY’S GARDEN THAT NEED IDENTIFICATION. CAN ANYONE IDENTIFY ANY OF THESE HOSTAS? THE PERSON WHO CORRECTLY ANSWERS THE MOST HOSTA WILL HAVE A DONATION MADE IN THEIR NAME BY THE WEEDPATCH GAZETTE TO HEIFER PROJECT. GOOD LUCK AND THANKS!