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Re-Blogging the Ultimate Pollinator & Native Plant Gardening Guide

Benjamin Vogt, a Nebraska landscape designer, has a blog that I recently added to Favorite Places: The Deep Middle. His post on March 17 was a Resource Guide to information about pollinators and native plants.


The Ultimate Pollinator & Native Plant Gardening Guide
I’m [Benjamin Vogt] celebrating 2 years of Milk the Weed with the nerdiest, awesome-ist list of links on butterfly and pollinator gardening I can come up with. It’s certainly not a complete list, but I hope it’s helpful to you as both a practical and philosophical guide. Prairie up!

(from The Deep Middle, B. Vogt)


Here are a few links from the article to get you started:

Milkweed & Monarch Concerns

How Monarchs Use Milkweed

Create a Habitat for Monarchs

Butterfly Gardens 101

Pollinator Partnerships

Benjamin’s article contains a wealth (pages!) of resource links.  Visit his site to see them all. Note that his statement sentences do not look like links, but if you hover over the text, it will highlight to show the link. I have also posted a link to his article on the “Cool Links” page, so you can have that resource at your fingertips. Prairie Up!#

In Your Garden, Choose Plants that Help the Environment

Required reading (use this link to read the article) from Doug Tallamy, author of Bringing Nature Home , via the NY Times. If the plants (that includes trees and shrubs) in your garden don’t help feed beneficial insects and animals, it’s time to re-think your choices. Which means a visit to the garden center, always a highlight of my week!

A Quote from Doug Tallamy:

“To me the choice is clear. The costs of increasing the percentage and biomass of natives in our suburban landscapes are small, and the benefits are immense. Increasing the percentage of natives in suburbia is a grassroots solution to the extinction crisis.

To succeed, we do not need to invoke governmental action; we do not need to purchase large tracts of pristine habitat that no longer exist; we do not need to limit ourselves to sending money to national and international conservation organizations and hoping it will be used productively. 

Our success is up to each one of us individually. We can each make a measurable difference almost immediately by planting a native nearby. As gardeners and stewards of our land, we have never been so empowered—and the ecological stakes have never been so high.” #

monarch on milkweed